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Writing the Group Essay

Exam Overview

❶They are less thorough or less precise in the way they address the task, and their analysis is less convincing.

AP English Literature: Exam Format and Question Types

AP English Literature Multiple-Choice Tips
Taking AP English Literature and Composition can lead to a future in ...
AP Literature Course Study Tips

Nothing is worse than getting halfway through an essay and having your pen run out of ink, or your pencil getting smudged. Often, readers prefer the look and clarity of black ink to colored ink or the graphite of pencil. Take that into mind when going into the free response portion of the exam. Before the free response portion begins, work out how much time you need to spend on each question.

It may even be helpful to bring a watch to time yourself on each essay. You need to give yourself ample time to complete each question. However, you also need to be sure that you are not rushing through the questions and leaving vital information out of your essays. The clarity of your writing is necessary for a good score on your essay. If the reader cannot decipher your chicken scratch, how can they possibly score it? Although this may be acceptable for the multiple-choice portion of the exam, it is absolutely inexcusable for your essays.

You only get three chances to prove your competency in the free response portion. Understand What the Readers are Looking For: As we said earlier, rubrics are a great resource to use when preparing for the AP Literature exam. They reflect exactly how your essay will be scored. Whether or not you understand what is happening in the passages given to you to read. Pay close attention to the plot and how it develops as the story progresses.

Whether or not you understand the theme of the passage. The theme is the dominating central idea in a work. The more references to the plot that you have in your essay, the better. However, this does not mean restate the entire storyline. This will bore the reader and make it seem like you are dancing around the question. Scorers like for you to be very clear and to the point in your essays.

The voice of your essay is an incredibly important characteristic used in scoring. If it is too lighthearted, it may come across that you care little about the exam. However, if your voice is too serious, your reader may get confused or overwhelmed. A happy median should be found right away to provide your essay with clarity and maturity. Listen to Your Teacher: This is perhaps the most important of all the free response tips.

Over the course of the semester, your teacher will provide you with ample advice for the exam. Hopefully these tips will help you tackle this massive exam with ease. Retelling what happened in the story is not an analysis. Thanks for the tip from Kim F. Think about the fact that the AP Test readers have been looking at essays on the same topics for three days. What will you do to be original and stand out that will surprise the reader at 4: Brainstorm what everyone else will say before writing.

Thanks for the tip from Amber B. Answer the question as it is actually asked. Thanks for the tip from Heather I. Answer the question in the introduction. Thanks for the tip from Rhonda G. Focused writing on two or three aspects of the text characterization, use of devices, etc accompanied with analysis will generate a higher score than lightly touching on 5 to 7 aspects.

As a reader we are happy that you can identify techniques, but what we are looking for is analysis. Thanks for the tip from Matt U. Always answer the question: Why did they chose that metaphor? What effect does it create within the text and within the reader? Thanks for the second tip from Matt U.

Pay attention to the wording of the questions and answers! Thanks for the tip from Susan R. Students who read widely and regularly are far more prepared to write and communicate clearly with a deeper understanding than students who do not read. Reading expands knowledge, vocabulary usage and comprehension and enables students to make connections within and between content areas which real world applications.

Thanks for the tip from Elizabeth B. Instead, use your time to focus on meaning. What important insights do you have to share? Make sure you provide much more analysis than plot summary.

Begin with a clear thesis and end with one strong concluding statement. Thanks for the tip from Julie H. Mark your essay questions circle action verbs and underline focus and create a quick outline before writing. The time spent will prevent the heartache of not addressing the prompt. Each essay is worth the same amount of points, but one is set for you to shine — know three books really well so that you can rock the free-response essay.

On the test — do it first while your mind is still fresh. Thanks for the tip from Diane S. Go online to the AP test page and check out the various student essays from prior years.

What makes an essay a 9? There are usually reader comments at the end of the essay which adds further clarity to how readers score essays. Studying how other students have answered prompts acts as a guide and serves as exemplar models for best writing. Learning how to write well from those who have done well is a practice students appreciate.

Thanks for the tip from Pam W. Find a good literary timeline to conceptualize what you read in terms of the art movement and historical time period. These can provide insight into the texts as well as help you remember what you have read. Thanks for the tip from Paul H.

Have four novels of literary quality and one play that the student is comfortable analyzing so no question 3 can stump the student. Thanks for the tip from Bill O. Analyze any figurative language. Thanks for the second tip from Bill O. Never be unacceptably brief: Analyze that and then keep writing!

Learn and practice using the language and function of literature, poetry, and rhetoric. Plan and execute their usage in your style, syntax, and art, and use the language when critiquing in workshops and discussing classics.

Thanks for the tip from Jon A. By brainstorming first, everyone can usually write at the same time because they have a good idea of what they will be saying.

Without the brainstorming part, the person responsible for the conclusion has to wait for everyone else to write in order to see how to conclude the essay. After everyone has drafted their piece of the essay, students read the essay in the order that the paragraphs should go in. Brainstorming helps, but invariably ideas come during the actual drafting so reading the essay together helps students to figure out if it makes sense and to make revisions as necessary.

The conversations that the groups have are interesting to me on two levels. The students engage again with the text, often refining their understanding of the text and building that understanding collaboratively with their group members.

On another level, however, students also have conversations around writing that are often quite deep. There are a couple of ways of assembling the essays that I have used. One way is for each student to cut out their paragraph s and then tape the essay onto a master sheet of paper in the order that it should be read. When we do this, I have students sign next to each of their paragraphs. When we have the opportunity for submitting paragraphs digitally, then students usually email their paragraphs to one person in the group who assembles the final draft in order.

In the beginning, I used to rush students through the process. For good writing to happen, however, students need some time to plan, draft, and revise. I have learned to slow it down. This is the core document for this course. It clearly lays out the course content and describes the exam and AP Program in general. Previously available as a secure resource only through your AP Course Audit account.

Since this exam is now publicly available, you can use the questions without restriction. The Released Exam and the Released Exam are two resources you can use with your students throughout the year. Some information in these Released Exams may not reflect the current course and exam. Exam Overview The AP English Literature and Composition Exam uses multiple-choice questions and free-response prompts to test students' skills in literary analysis of prose and verse texts.

A literary analysis of a given poem A literary analysis of a given passage of prose fiction this may include drama An analysis that examines a specific concept, issue, or element in a work of literary merit selected by the student. Exam Questions and Scoring Information For free-response questions from prior exams, along with scoring information, check out the tables below. Secure Exams for Classroom Use Includes sample student responses and scoring commentary.

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The AP Literature exam is a three-hour exam: It includes one question, hour-long multiple-choice section based on four-five prose and poetry passages, and a two hour free-response section with three essays—one analyzing a poetry passage, one analyzing a prose passage, and one analyzing a work chosen by the student.

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Over the course of the last three years, I have tried this with 9th graders and with students in both AP Literature and AP Language. I have also shared this with some of my Writing Project colleagues, many of whom have also found the process to be beneficial. Sep 04,  · We offer a wide variety of writing services including essays, research papers, term papers, thesis among many others. We have a lot of experience in the academic writing industry. We were once.

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Tips from an AP reader; Suggest Readings; Practice! How are the English Literature exams scored? The multiple choice section is machine scored. Students receive one point for each correct answer and are penalized a quarter point for each incorrect response. § Use clear transitions that help the reader follow the flow of your essay. Keep. The Ultimate List of AP English Literature Tips The AP English Literature and Composition exam is designed to test your ability to think critically and analyze literary excerpts. The test is three hours long and consists of a multiple-choice portion (worth 45% of your grade) and an essay portion (worth 55% of your grade).