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Essay Ideas: ApplyTexas Topic A
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Essay Topics - Spring 2018, Summer 2018 & Fall 2018

Both versions communicate the same things about the imagined destination, but the second essay does a much better job showing who Eleanor is as a person. All we really learn from the first excerpt is that Eleanor must like Star Trek. We can also infer that she probably likes leadership, exploration, and adventure, since she wants to captain a starship.

Admissions officers shouldn't have to infer who you are from your essay—your essay should lay it out for them. In the second essay, on the other hand, Eleanor clearly lays out the qualities that would make her a great Command officer, and provides examples of how she exemplifies these qualities. She ties the abstract destination to concrete things from her life such as hapkido and photography. This provides a much more well-rounded picture of what Eleanor could bring to the student body and the school at large.

Remember to tie your imaginative destination to concrete details about your special qualities! A future as a driving coach for motorcoach drivers was a no-brainer for the founding member of the homonym club. Personal interaction with objects, images and spaces can be so powerful as to change the way one thinks about particular issues or topics.

What did you do to act upon your new thinking and what have you done to prepare yourself for further study in this area? This essay topic is trying to ask as broadly as possible about an experience with art that has moved you in some way. This means that your options for answering the question are quite varied. So what are the two different parts of this prompt? Let's take a look. Think of a time you experienced that blown-away feeling when looking at something man-made.

This is the reaction and situation the first part of the essay wants you to recreate. You can focus on a learning experience, which includes both classes and extracurricular activities, or you can focus on a direct experience in which you encountered an object or space without the mediation of a class or teacher. The only limit to your focus object is that it is something made by someone other than you.

Your reaction should be in conversation with the original artist—not a form of navel-gazing. The key for this part of the essay is that your description needs to segue into a story of change and transformation. When you see the Angkor Wat Temple, you can't help but be psyched that at least humans haven't wasted all their time on earth.

This brings us to the second part of the essay prompt: What qualities, philosophy, or themes do you now try to infuse into what you create? You have some choice, too, when it comes to answering, "What have you done to prepare yourself for further study in this area?

Or you could describe investigating new media or techniques to emulate something you saw. Or you could discuss learning about the period, genre, school, or philosophical theory that the original piece of art comes from in order to give yourself a more contextualized understanding.

At the same time, this essay is asking you to show your own creative readiness. Describe not only the work you have produced but also your ability to introduce new elements into that work—in this case, inspired by the piece you described. What are some best practices for teasing out the complexities of art in written form? Here are some helpful tips as you brainstorm and write your essay. For example, you could write about something you learned on your own from a documentary, museum visit, or art book.

If you're writing about a direct experience with art, don't necessarily fixate on a classical piece. Alternatively, you could discuss a little-known public sculpture, a particularly striking building or bridge you saw while traveling, or a gallery exhibition. Whatever you end up writing about, make sure you know some of the identifying details. The make-it-or-break-it moment in this essay will be your ability to explain what affected you in the object you're writing about.

Do you think it or you was in the right place at the right time to be moved by it, or would it have affected you the same way no matter where or when you saw it? Be careful with your explanation since it can easily get so vague as to be meaningless or so obscure and "deep" that you lose your reader. Before you start trying to put it down on paper, try to talk out what you plan to say either with a friend, parent, or teacher. When you think about what you've been making or thinking about making during your high school career, what is the trajectory of your ideas?

How has your understanding of the materials you want to work with changed? What about the message you want your works to convey? Or the way you want your works to be seen by others? What is the reason you feel compelled to be creative? Just as nothing ruins a joke as explaining it does, nothing ruins the wordless experience of looking at art as talking it to death does. Still, you need to find a way to use words to give the reader a sense of what the piece that moved you actually looks like —particularly if the reader isn't familiar with the work or the artist that created it.

Here is my suggested trick for writing well about art. First, be specific about the object. Second, step away from the concrete and get creative with language by using techniques such as comparative description. Use your imagination to create emotionally resonant similes. Is there a form of movement e. Does it remind you of something from the natural world e. If the work is figurative, imagine what has been happening just before the moment in time it captures.

What happened just after this point? Using these kinds of non-literal descriptors will let your reader understand both the actual physical object and its aesthetic appeal. There may be personal information that you want considered as part of your admissions application. Write an essay describing that information. You might include exceptional hardships, challenges, or opportunities that have shaped or impacted your abilities or academic credentials, personal responsibilities, exceptional achievements or talents, educational goals, or ways in which you might contribute to an institution committed to creating a diverse learning environment.

UT Austin allows its applicants to mix and match essays from the ApplyTexas application from its own option: This essay prompt states that the additional information you might want to share with the admissions team can be either positive or negative—so long as it qualifies as "exceptional" in some way.

In fact, the prompt actually uses the word "exceptional" twice to really cement the idea that the everyday challenges or successes are not what this essay should highlight. In this sense, determining whether your experiences qualify for this prompt is a matter of degrees. For example, did you manage to thrive despite being raised by a single parent?

But what if you flourished despite living in multiple foster families and aging out of the system during your senior year of high school? Such a narrative is arguably more appropriate for Topic S. Well done, and feel free to tell your story for Topic C. But if you were the youngest black belt in the history of the sport to win a national title, you're better off writing about this for Topic S.

The answer to this question is pretty straightforward. If you're one of these two guys, you definitely qualify for this essay topic. Let's run through a few tricks for ensuring that your essay to Topic S makes the most of your exceptionalism. Although there are many different moving, emotionally impactful experiences we can have, some of these are actually quite common. Wondering whether what you went through counts?

This might be a good time to run your Topic S idea by a parent, sibling, school counselor, or trusted teacher. Do they think your experience is widespread? And do they agree that you truly lived a life less ordinary?

The majority of your answer to the Topic S prompt should be telling your story and its impact on you and your life. One of the reasons that the admissions office wants to find out which of the applicants has been through something unlike most other people is that they're hoping to increase the number of perspectives in the student body.

Think about, and include in your essay, how you will impact campus life. This can be very literal—if you're, say, a jazz singer who's released several acclaimed albums, you might want to perform on campus. Or it can be much more oblique—if you're disabled, for example, you'll be able to offer a perspective that differs from the able-bodied majority. You can do this by picking a specific moment during your hardship or accomplishment to narrate as a small short story.

Your goal is to make the extraordinary into something at least somewhat relatable—and the way you do that is by making your writing down to earth. As I've already described, the most important feature of any topic for this prompt is that it must be genuinely exceptional.

I've listed some examples below. Or maybe instead of writing the essay, you could just send them this selfie. UT Austin also has two special prompts specifically for nursing applicants Topic N and for social work applicants Topic W. These prompts are quite similar, and we will go over both of them briefly here. Considering nursing as your first-choice major, discuss how your current and future academic activities, extracurricular pursuits and life experiences will help you achieve your goals.

Discuss the reasons you chose social work as your first-choice major and how a social work degree from UT Austin will prepare you for the future. Admissions officers will be looking for evidence that you're genuinely interested in this career and that you have an aptitude for it.

So i f you have any relevant clinical, research, or volunteer experience, admissions officers definitely want to know this! It's OK to take a broad view of what's relevant here. Anything that involves working with people is a relevant experience for prospective nursing and social work students. Admissions officers also want to know that you're really interested in the UT Austin program, so be sure to identify features of the program nursing or social work that appeal to you. In other words, why UT Austin?

What makes you a good fit here? Finally, they're looking for individuals who have clear goals as well as a general idea of what they want to do with their degree.

Are you interested in working with a specific population or specialty? What led you to this conclusion? UT Austin also includes its own prompt Topic S , in addition to Topics N and W, which are for nursing and social work applicants, respectively. Curious about the other college essay choices out there?

If your target college also accepts the Common Application, check out our guide to the Common App essay prompts to see whether they would be a better fit for you. Interested to see how other people tackled this part of the application? Stuck on what to write about? Read our suggestions for how to come up with great essay ideas. Working on the rest of your college applications? We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score.

Download it for free now:. Anna scored in the 99th percentile on her SATs in high school, and went on to major in English at Princeton and to get her doctorate in English Literature at Columbia. She is passionate about improving student access to higher education. You should definitely follow us on social media. You'll get updates on our latest articles right on your feed. Follow us on all 3 of our social networks:. How to Get a Perfect , by a Perfect Scorer. Score on SAT Math. Score on SAT Reading.

Score on SAT Writing. What ACT target score should you be aiming for? Anna Wulick Jun 2, 8: To help you navigate this long guide, here is an overview of what we'll be talking about: What Are the ApplyTexas Essays? Here are some essay submission requirement examples from a range of Texas schools: Want to build the best possible college application?

There are definitely ways to be more specific and creative with your response to make it stand out. You could describe just one special member of your family, neighborhood, or community and how your relationship or interactions with them have shaped you. You could write your essay about a specific tradition or event within a community, and why it is important to who you have become.

Think about a community that is important to you and how you have matured or grown through being a member of that community. For me, there are two specific communities that stand out in my mind when I think about myself in high school. I was also able to join my church choir, where for many years I was the only member under the age of forty.

If I were to write about either community, I would discuss how being one of the oldest members of a group homeschooling helped me to grow by exposing me to caretaking roles that required developing personal responsibility and proactive engagement; or how being the youngest member of a group choir allowed me the experience of befriending people from generations outside of my peer group, and developing a valuable connection with people who came from all different places around the globe, and had valuable and unique life experiences to share.

Essentially, my essay s would be about the uniqueness of my position and how immersing myself in these out-of-the-ordinary social groups and settings has helped shape my life. In approaching this essay, think about the person you are and the person that you want to become — think about the values you have not just religious ones , and why you have them. What is important to you in life? Can you point to specific circumstances or people in your life that have led you to develop this perspective, or have reinforced a perspective you already held?

Focusing on a single subject will definitely be the way to go with this essay. Try to stay away from clinically dissecting your day. Person, I go to this church, I attend this school, etc. The key to unlocking this essay is to focus on the back half: I hail from a community of chefs and foodies.

Our house seal bears the image of two bowls — one full of gumbo, the other of paella. We hope you find this information helpful.

If you have any questions about completing your application for admission, please contact the Office of Admissions at to speak with an admissions counselor. Freshman applicants can submit either the ApplyTexas application or the Coalition for College Access, Affordability, and Success application. Use your application to report your complete academic record, including college credit earned as dual credit. The spring application opens no later than March 1.

During peak periods, this can take days. If you are not a U. Application fee waivers are available for eligible students. Students may request a fee waiver by indicating their eligibility on the online application. A separate request form is not required, however, students may be required to submit documentation in support of a request. Request a fee waiver when you apply for admission or submit the Request for Fee Waiver form using Document Upload.

Box Austin, TX Do not send cash or personal checks. Please keep your essay between words typically two to three paragraphs. What was the environment in which you were raised? Describe your family, home, neighborhood or community, and explain how it has shaped you as a person. Generally, you should plan to submit your essay in conjunction with your admissions application.

Answer three short answer prompts in your ApplyTexas or Coalition for College application. All applicants must submit three short answers responding to prompts in your admissions application. Answers are limited to no more than 40 lines, or about — words, typically the length of one paragraph. Art and Art History, Nursing, and Social Work require additional short answer questions of their applicants.

Please see major-specific items. If you could have any career, what would it be? This is an opportunity to describe your academic and future professional interests. How have your interests and experiences influenced your choice of majors or your plans to explore in college?

Do you believe your academic record transcript information and test scores provide an accurate representation of you as a student? Why or why not? Feel free to address anything you want the Office of Admissions to know about your academic record so that we can consider this information when we review your application.

Leadership can be demonstrated by positions you hold as an officer in a club or organization, but other types of leadership are important too. Leaders can emerge in various situations at any given time, including outside of the school experience. Please share a brief description of the type of leadership qualities you possess, from school and non-school related experiences, including demonstrations of leadership in your job, your community, or within your family responsibilities, and then share how you hope to demonstrate leadership as a member of our campus community.

In words or less, please tell us about a meaningful way in which an artwork, or artist, has changed your life. How has this prompted your ambitions for a life in the arts? Discuss the reasons you chose social work as your first-choice major and how a social work degree from UT Austin will prepare you for the future.

You will be required to complete the short answer responses in order to complete and submit your admissions application. Have your high school send us your official transcript s documenting all coursework undertaken during your high school career.

Rank should be indicated as your numerical position out of the total number of students in the class. Applicants should submit transcripts indicating rank for the latest completed semester prior to the application deadline. If you attend a Texas public school, your transcript should indicate the high school diploma program you will be graduating under, as defined in the state's Uniform Admission Policy. Official transcripts are required and must be sent directly to UT Austin by your high school.

Please work with your high school to submit your official academic transcript. Applicants who earned a GED must submit high school transcript s showing any coursework completed, along with a copy of the GED certificate.

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applytexas essay topics Topic A (Freshman and International Freshman): Use this topic if you are applying for admission after the Spring semester.

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ApplyTexas Essay Prompts A, B and C For U.S. Freshman and International Freshman Applications Slated to replace current ApplyTexas essay choices A, B and C.

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Apply Texas College Essay Prompts for Class of June 3, By Jolyn Brand The Apply Texas application is a common application form for most Texas public universities. The ApplyTexas application contains four essay prompts (Topics A, B, C, and D), with different schools requiring different combinations of mandatory and optional essays. UT Austin also includes its own prompt (Topic S), in addition to Topics N and W, which are for nursing and social work applicants, respectively.

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ApplyTexas Essays: Exploring the 3 Main Essay Prompts Back in August, my colleague gave advice on essay length for Apply Texas, which doesn’t place rigid constraints on word count. Today, we’re going to talk about the three main essay prompts, Topics A, B, and C, and how you should think about your responses to them. APPLYTEXAS ESSAYS: TOPIC B. Topic B: Some students have an identity, an interest, or a talent that defines them in an essential way. If you are one of these students, then tell us about yourself. Good news on this new prompt! It’s very similar to the first of the five prompts for The Common Application.