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❶New to eCheat Create an Account! In five pages this paper compares DeLillo's and Hawthorne's works in terms of social acceptance and isolation.

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After she is released from prison, Hester remains in Boston because
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Prynne chooses to embrace the scarlet letter rather than let the feeling of guilt take over her life because she desired to set a good example for her daughter, Pearl. She was able to embrace her sin and the scarlet letter because she was working to set an example for her daughter. The town people would always be reminded of her sin. Prynne did not let the guilt of her sin produce a major impact on her life.

Rather she accepted her transgression and learned the importance of not letting her past mistakes and guilt negatively affect her future. The rosebush symbolizes forgiveness from guilt throughout The Scarlet Letter. Pearl responded with this meltdown because she wanted forgiveness for her mother and for her father, Reverend Dimmesdale, to be accepted by the community.

Pearl felt guilty but blamed it on others. She was seeking revenge on the townspeople for the way they made her mother feel. The irony of the rosebush is how it hurt Prynne, Pearl, and Dimmesdale, like the thorns on a rosebush when touched. In the end the family moved out of their community attempting to not let the mistakes of the past take over their present lives.

Introductory to The Scarlet Letter Chapter 1: The Prison Door Chapter 2: The Marketplace Chapter 3: The Recognition Chapter 4: The Interview Chapter 5: Hester at Her Needle Chapter 6: The Elf-Child and the Minister Chapter 9: The Leech Chapter The Leech and His Patient Chapter Inside a Heart Chapter Another View of Hester Chapter Hester and the Doctor Chapter Hester and Pearl Chapter A Forest Walk Chapter The Pastor and His Parishioner Chapter A Flood of Sunshine Chapter In all these examples, the meaning of the symbol depends on the context and sometimes the interpreter.

For example, in the second scaffold scene, the community sees the scarlet A in the sky as a sign that the dying Governor Winthrop has become an angel; Dimmesdale, however, sees it as a sign of his own secret sin.

The community initially sees the letter on Hester's bosom as a mark of just punishment and a symbol to deter others from sin. Hester is a Fallen Woman with a symbol of her guilt. Later, when she becomes a frequent visitor in homes of pain and sorrow, the A is seen to represent "Able" or "Angel. Light and darkness, sunshine and shadows, noon and midnight, are all manifestations of the same images.

Likewise, colors — such as red, gray, and black — play a role in the symbolic nature of the background and scenery. But, similar to the characters, the context determines what role the light or colors play. The Scarlet Letter 's first chapter ends with an admonition to "relieve the darkening close of a tale of human frailty and sorrow" with "some sweet moral blossom. In Chapter 16, Hester and Dimmesdale meet in the forest with a "gray expanse of cloud" and a narrow path hemmed in by the black and dense forest.

The feelings of the lovers, weighed down by guilt, are reflected in the darkness of nature. Every so often, sunshine flickers on the setting. But Pearl reminds her mother that the sun will not shine on the sinful Hester; it does shine, however, when Hester passionately lets down her hair.

The sun is the symbol of untroubled, guilt-free happiness, or perhaps the approval of God and nature. It also seems to be, at times, the light of truth and grace.

Darkness is always associated with Chillingworth. It is also part of the description of the jail in Chapter 1, the scene of sin and punishment.

The Puritans in that scene wear gray hats, and the darkness of the jail is relieved by the sunshine of the outside. When Hester comes into the sunshine from the darkness, she must squint at the light of day, and her iniquity is placed for all to see. Noon is the time of Dimmesdale's confession, and daylight is the symbol of exposure. Nighttime, however, is the symbol of concealment, and Dimmesdale stands on the scaffold at midnight, concealing his confession from the community.

In the end, even the grave of Dimmesdale and Hester is in darkness. Colors play a similar role to light and darkness. One of the predominant colors is red, seen in the roses, the letter, Pearl's clothing, the "scarlet woman," Chillingworth's eyes, and the streak of the meteor. At night and always with the physician, the letter is associated with darkness and evil; in the other associations, it is a part of nature, passion, lawlessness, and imagination. The context determines the meaning.

Black and gray are colors associated with the Puritans, gloom, death, sin, and the narrow path of righteousness through the forest of sin. Three chapters that contain a multitude of color images are Chapters 5, 11, and Even Hawthorne's settings are symbolic.

The Puritan village with its marketplace and scaffold is a place of rigid rules, concern with sin and punishment, and self-examination. Public humiliation and penance are symbolized by the scaffold, the only place where Dimmesdale can go to atone for his guilt and escape his tormentor's clutches.

The collective community that watches, at beginning and end, is a symbol of the rigid Puritan point of view with unquestioning obedience to the law. The Church and State are ubiquitous forces to contend with in this colony, as Hester finds out to her dismay.

They see Dimmesdale as a figure of public approval, Chillingworth, at least initially, as a man of learning to be revered, and Hester as the outcast. Predominant colors are black and gray, and the gloom of the community is omnipresent. However, nearby is the forest, home of the Black Man but also a place of freedom. Here the sun shines on Pearl, and she absorbs and keeps it. The forest represents a natural world, governed by natural laws, as opposed to the artificial, Puritan community with its man-made laws.

In this world, Hester can take off her cap, let down her hair, and discuss plans with Dimmesdale to be together away from the rigid laws of the Puritans.

As part of this forest, the brook provides "a boundary between two worlds. However, the forest is also a moral wilderness that Hester finds herself in once she is forced to wear the sign of her guilt.

The forest is also a symbolic place where witches gather, souls are signed away to the devil, and Dimmesdale can "yield himself with deliberate choice.

Mistress Hibbins knows on sight those who would wander "in the forest" or, in other words, secretly do Satan's work.

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The Scarlet Letter essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

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Free Essay on Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter - Pearl as The Scarlet Letter - Pearl as The Scarlet Letter The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a novel that shows the Puritanical way of life.

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Scarlet letter essay, - Buy research papers writing service. Rest assured that you will be assigned a pro in the field of your study. Moreover, all of our experts are familiar with reference styles and formatting. Symbolism in the Scarlet Letter Essay Words | 4 Pages In the novel "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne symbolism is used to represent the evolution of the characters primarily that of Hester Prynne.

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Free essays on Scarlet Letter available at moiprods.tk, the largest free essay community. Kelsey Federspill Scarlet Letter Literary Analysis R5 2. 12 Over Coming Guilt Remorse is a feeling experienced after committing an act that produces a sense of guilt. A life lesson can be learned in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel, The Scarlet Letter, about the theme of guilt.