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Final Film Critique Essay Sample

Movie Review Purpose

❶Cal finds them again and sees that Rose is cold so he puts his jacket on her which he neglects to remember has the necklace in the pocket. When it comes to loading the lifeboats and it only being woman and children it makes you wonder if society would still do the same today.

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Final Film Critique Essay Sample
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How to Develop Critical Thinking

Let them know early on, so that you can spend the rest of the time "proving" your rating. Using stars, a score out of 10 or , or the simple thumbs-up and thumbs-down is a quick way to give your thoughts. You then write about why you chose that rating. Ultimately, the utter awe and spectacle of space swept me through the admittedly heavy-handed plotting and dialogue.

This is where taking notes during the movie really pays off. No one cares about your opinion if you can't give facts that support your argument.. Jordan and Octavia Spencer's chemistry would carry Fruitvale Station even if the script wasn't so good. The mid-movie prison scene in particular, where the camera never leaves their faces, show how much they can convey with nothing but their eyelids, the flashing tension of neck muscles, and a barely cracking voice.

The attention to detail in fight scenes, where every weapon, lightbulb, and slick patch of ground is accounted for, doesn't translate to an ending that seems powerful but ultimately says little of substance. Move beyond the obvious plot analysis. Plot is just one piece of a movie, and shouldn't dictate your entire review. Some movies don't have great or compelling plots, but that doesn't mean the movie itself is bad.

Other things to focus on include: Every frame feels like a painting worth sitting in. Space may be dangerous and scary, but the joy of scientific discovery is intoxicating.

The eerie silence of the desert, punctuated by the brief spells of violent, up-close-and-personal sound effects of hunter and hunted, keeps you constantly on the edge of your seat. Bring your review full-circle in the ending. Give the review some closure, usually by trying back to your opening fact.

Remember, people read reviews to decide whether or not they should watch a movie. End on a sentence that tells them. But revenge, much like every taut minute of this thriller, is far too addictive to give up until the bitter end. But most of the scenes, too sweet by half, should have been in the trash long before this movie was put out.

It might not even be "good. Gather basic facts about the movie. You can do this before or after you watch the movie, but you should definitely do it before you write the review, because you'll need to weave the facts into your review as you write. Here's what you need to know: The title of the film, and the year it came out. The names of the lead actors. Take notes on the movie as you watch it.

Before you sit down to watch a film, get out a notepad or a laptop to take notes. Movies are long, and you can easily forget details or major plot points. Taking notes allows you to jot down little things you can return to later.

Make a note every time something sticks out to you, whether it's good or bad. This could be costuming, makeup, set design, music, etc. Think about how this detail relates to the rest of the movie and what it means in the context of your review. Take note of patterns you begin to notice as the movie unfolds. Use the pause button frequently so you make sure not to miss anything, and rewind as necessary.

Analyze the mechanics of the movie. Analyze the different components that came together in the movie as you watch. During or after your viewing, ask yourself what impression the movie left with you in these areas: If the movie was slow, or didn't include things you thought were necessary, you can attribute this to the director.

If you've seen other movies directed by the same person, compare them and determine which you like the most. What techniques were used to film the movie? What setting and background elements helped to create a certain tone? Evaluate the script, including dialogue and characterization. Did you feel like the plot was inventive and unpredictable or boring and weak? Did the characters' words seem credible to you? Was the movie choppy or did it flow smoothly from scene to scene?

Did they incorporate a montage to help build the story? And was this obstructive to the narrative or did it help it? Did they use long cuts to help accentuate an actor's acting ability or many reaction shots to show a group's reaction to an event or dialogue? If visual effects were used were the plates well chosen and were the composited effects part of a seamless experience?

Whether the effects looked realistic or not is not the jurisdiction of an editor, however, they do choose the footage to be sent off to the compositors so this could still affect the film. Did the clothing choices fit the style of the movie?

Did they contribute to the overall tone, rather than digressing from it? Consider how the setting of the film influenced its other elements. Did it add or subtract from the experience for you?

If the movie was filmed in a real place, was this location well-chosen? Did it work with the scenes? A soundtrack can make or break a movie, especially if the songs have a particular message or meaning to them. Watch it one more time. It's impossible to fully understand a movie you've only seen one time, especially if you're pausing it often to take notes. Watch it at least once more before you compose your review.

Pay attention to details you might have missed the first time around. Pick new points of focus this time; if you took a lot of notes on the acting the first time you watched the movie, focus on the cinematography the second time around. Create an original thesis based on your analysis.

Now that you've thoroughly studied the movie, what unique insights can you bring to the table? Come up with a thesis, a central idea to discuss and back up with your observations on the various elements of the film. Your thesis should be discussed in the first paragraph of your review.

Having a thesis will take your review beyond the plot summary stage and into the realm of film criticism, which is rightfully its own art form. Ask yourself the following questions to come up with a compelling thesis for your review: Does the film reflect on a current event or contemporary issue?

It could be the director's way of engaging in a bigger conversation. Look for ways to relate the content of the film to the "real" world. Does the film seem to have a message, or does it attempt to elicit a specific response or emotion from the audience? You could discuss whether or not it achieves its own goals. Does the film connect with you on a personal level?

You could write a review stemming from your own feelings and weave in some personal stories to make it interesting for your readers. Follow your thesis paragraph with a short plot summary. It's good to give readers an idea of what they'll be in for if they decide to see the movie you're reviewing. Give a brief summary of the plot in which you identify the main characters, describe the setting, and give a sense of the central conflict or point of the movie.

Never break the number one rule of movie reviews: Don't ruin the movie for your readers! When you name characters in your plot summary, list the actors' names directly afterward in parenthesis. Find a place to mention the director's name and the full movie title. If you feel you must discuss information that might "spoil" things for readers, warn them first. Move into your analysis of the movie. Write several paragraphs discussing interesting elements of the movie that support your thesis.

Discuss the acting, the direction, the cinematography, the setting, and so on, using clear, entertaining prose that keeps your readers engaged. Keep your writing clear and easy to understand. Don't use too much technical filmmaking jargon, and make your language crisp and accessible. Present both the facts and your opinion. For example, you might state something such as, "The Baroque background music was a jarring contrast to the 20th century setting. Use plenty of examples to back up your points.

If you make a statement about the movie, back it up with a descriptive example. Describe the way scenes look, the way a certain person acted, camera angles, and so on. You can quote dialogue to help you make your points as well.

In this way you are giving your readers a feel for the movie and continuing to express your critique of the film at the same time. Give it some personality. You could treat your review like a formal college essay, but it's more interesting if you make it your own. The structure of the movie is how the parts of it relate to each other or how the plot is built. An unpredictable plot sometimes appeals to philosophical issues. Examine the plot and structure to identify if they benefit the movie in this regard.

A dialogue is a conversation between two or more people, or characters, for this matter. Watch the body language of the actors and decide whether their gestures correspond to their words or not. Try to explain the reasons behind the adaptation of these new techniques or ideas. There should be specific reasons for the original element to appear. A visual presentation is when characters act and react to each other and the setting to develop the action and the plot of the movie.

This interaction typically involves a lot of dialogue. The general structure of the critique resembles the structure of an essay. A good structure is the basis and a necessary condition of a successful paper. Check out some good movie critique examples before you start your writing. Now that you know all the essential elements of a movie critique structure, it's high time to consider how to present your information in the most digestible and impressive way.

Using common phrases and set expressions in your movie critique writing will make your content more engaging, diverse, and easy to read. Now you can confidently claim that you know how to write a movie critique and even have a whole list of helpful vocabulary you can include.

We hope that these tips were helpful and that your next critical paper about a movie will be a success. Be sure to check out our blog for more useful articles!

The professional writers at Custom-Writing. I hope you could help me, thank you! By the way, these tips really are a big help.

Organizing Your Critique Essay

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Gummo - Movie Critique - The film Gummo is intended to be a symbolic movie in which fantasy and reality intertwine. Initially, the film opens in a small town in .

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In a movie critique essay, you are to criticize the means of film production and give some practical pieces of advice on what could be changed in order to enhance the quality of the film . When starting your critique essay, The first thing you have to do when learning how to write a critique on a movie is to learn the material you’re studying by heart—do more than watch the movie: check the IMDB page, read other reviews about it and find out the context in which it was made.

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Writing a film analysis essay is an assignment that is less likely to terrorize those who fear the idea of writing an essay, because it allows them to write about something most people enjoy. Film analysis is not the same thing as writing a movie review, which involves passively watching a movie. An. The introduction. A movie review should open up with an introduction. The introduction is the most appealing way of how to start a movie review, and contains the summary of the movie .