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6 Awesome Careers for Writers

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❶When the performance is mainly for adults the performers are generally called monologists. This is ghostwriting at its finest — the speechwriter remains anonymous while carefully matching the speaker's style, tone and philosophy.

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A common option is to pursue a vocational route such as teaching, journalism, librarianship or publishing. Vocational courses allow you to study in an area in which you would like to have a career, should you choose not to continue as a full-time writer. For more information on further study and to find a course that interests you, see Masters degrees and search postgraduate courses. Almost one in ten creative writing graduates who are in employment in the UK are working as authors, writers and translators.

For a detailed breakdown of what creative writing graduates are doing six months after graduation, see What Do Graduates Do? Jobs and work experience Postgraduate study Careers advice Applying for university. Search graduate jobs Job profiles Work experience and internships Employer profiles What job would suit me? Job sectors Apprenticeships Working abroad Gap year Self-employment.

Search postgraduate courses Funding postgraduate study Universities and departments Study abroad Conversion courses Law qualifications. What can I do with my degree? Getting a job CVs and cover letters. Applying for jobs Interview tips Open days and events.

Choosing a course Getting into university Student loans and finance. University life Changing or leaving your course Alternatives to university. Jobs and work experience Search graduate jobs Job profiles Work experience and internships Employer profiles What job would suit me? Getting a job CVs and cover letters Applying for jobs Interview tips Open days and events Applying for university Choosing a course Getting into university Student loans and finance University life Changing or leaving your course Alternatives to university Post a job.

However, the skills gained on a creative writing course are useful in a range of careers Job options Jobs directly related to your degree include: Advertising copywriter Arts administrator Creative director Digital copywriter Editorial assistant Lexicographer Magazine journalist Newspaper journalist Web content manager Writer Jobs where your degree would be useful include: Academic librarian Film director Information officer Marketing executive Primary school teacher Public librarian Public relations officer Secondary school teacher Social media manager Remember that many employers accept applications from graduates with any degree subject, so don't restrict your thinking to the jobs listed here.

Work experience Building a portfolio of written work, especially any that you've had published, will help to evidence your writing skill and establish your reputation as a writer.

Typical employers As a creative writing graduate you may work to establish yourself as a writer on a self-employed basis, either writing your own works, or writing for others in a freelance capacity.

Alternatively, you could find opportunities with a variety of employers, including: Skills for your CV As well as acquiring specialist knowledge of creative writing, you'll have developed effective written and oral communication skills through your degree.

Other strengths you can evidence include: That might involve working with creative agencies like ours to define the company's language, and in some cases globe-trotting around different offices to train people to write in that language. Although heads of brand language are a very new thing, most big companies have been employing their own writers for years, especially in areas like internal communications, web writing and new business.

Some companies, for example, have teams of bid writers to help them win new contracts. And there are many more people in areas like HR, customer service and PR who wouldn't call themselves 'writers', but do spend most of their days writing at work.

Then of course there are the creative agencies like brand consultancies, web agencies, design agencies and language consultancies that employ both full-time and freelance writers. Whether you decide to work for an agency, a client or yourself, the choice for business writers has never been bigger. One minute you might be writing a blog for a bank or a poem for a crisp packet, the next you might be interviewing a CEO for an annual report.

Or you can specialise, in anything from social media to corporate responsibility to web editing. Starting out as a specialist in a particular subject can actually be an advantage. So a qualification in IT today could see you writing the manual for the next big smartphone tomorrow. And a law degree could be put to good, creative use if you can translate and rewrite legalese into something that's easier to understand and more fun to read.

Your options aren't limited to writing, either. Even at The Writer, we don't just write. We help companies define the language they use. We train people to be better and more creative writers at work. We even come up with names for companies and products. And our team comes from all sorts of backgrounds, including publishing, human rights and literature, branding, magazines and PR. The bad news is it isn't as straightforward as, say, becoming a journalist where there's an obvious course to study and a well-trodden career path to follow.

There are some courses around: And you could do worse than starting with a degree in English, journalism or creative writing.

But at the end you'll still be faced with The Graduate's Conundrum: For example, you could volunteer as a mentor at the Ministry of Stories , a creative writing centre in east London that uses storytelling to inspire kids aged 8 — As well as hosting talks and events where you can meet business writers, they also run regular creative writing projects for members.

At The Writer we have our own take on work experience, called 'Word Experience'. Instead of the traditional summer-holiday placement, we get 20 undergraduates in for two days of hands-on workshops.

In that time, the students learn practical things like how to improve their CVs and cover letters. But the bigger point is to show them that an English literature degree could lead to a job that's interesting, creative

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Oct 22,  · As you can see, there are several career options available to you in the field of writing that have nothing to do with being a novelist or a journalist. Writing is a creative and challenging endeavor that can bring you success and fulfillment across many moiprods.tk: Kimberly Pendergrass.

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Creative writing careers — they’re out there! If creative writing is your passion, then you’d probably enjoy a career in which you could spend all day (or at least most of the day) pursuing that passion.

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The creative writing major serves as an introduction to genre writing, nurtures student interest in creative writing, and uses workshops and classroom-based instruction to improve their writing. The writing emphases major covers both literature and writing. There are some courses around: ­Falmouth University College, for example, offers a Business and Editorial Writing module as part of its Professional Writing MA. And you could do worse than starting with a degree in English, journalism or creative writing.

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Jun 29,  · Research is a key part of the job, and proposal writers spend a lot of time analyzing requests for quotations, researching the market and determining potential costs before writing the proposal. This type of writing requires a deep understanding of business language, copywriting techniques and procurement. A copywriting gig is a natural fit for aspiring novelists or screenwriters, and it’s a profession that’s growing in leaps and bounds. To get an idea of what kind of jobs are available, search under writing jobs and writing gigs on moiprods.tk in your local area, or enter “copywriter” on a .